Spy software python for qgis

 

I've heard from several places that the best module for this is a module called Scapy, unfortunately, it makes python.exe crash on my system. I would assume that it's just a problem with how I installed it, except that many other people have told me that it doesn't work particularly well on Windows. (If anyone is interested, I'm running Windows Vista, which might affect things).

After reading the answer telling me to install PyPcap, I messed around with it a bit and found out that Scapy, which I had tried using, was telling me to install PyPcap as well, except that it's a modified version for it's use. It was this modified PyPcap that was causing the problem, apparently, since the example in the answer also caused a hang.

I installed the original version of PyPcap (from Google's site), and Scapy started working fine (I didn't try many things, but at least it didn't crash as soon as I started sniffing). I sent a new defect ticket to the Scapy developers: http://trac.secdev.org/scapy/ticket/166 , hope they can do something with it.

Spy software python for qgis

WiringPi2 for Python is an excellent GPIO handling system written by Gordon ‘Drogon’ Henderson and packaged for Python by Phil ‘Gadgetoid’ Howard . It uses Arduino-like scripting language. For simple GPIO work, I still tend to use RPi.GPIO because that’s what I first got started with, but WiringPi is a very good alternative. It currently has more features.

One of the reasons (I think) the take-up for WiringPi-Python has been a bit slow, despite its richer feature set, is the lack of documentation. I’m hoping that this series of articles will provide documentation to open the door to more people using WiringPi 2 for Python. The basics in this first article should all work for both WiringPi and WiringPi 2 for Python.

If you’ve used my Gertboard Python software , you may well have used both the original WiringPi AND RPi.GPIO. WiringPi2 is an upgrade with more features added.

I've heard from several places that the best module for this is a module called Scapy, unfortunately, it makes python.exe crash on my system. I would assume that it's just a problem with how I installed it, except that many other people have told me that it doesn't work particularly well on Windows. (If anyone is interested, I'm running Windows Vista, which might affect things).

After reading the answer telling me to install PyPcap, I messed around with it a bit and found out that Scapy, which I had tried using, was telling me to install PyPcap as well, except that it's a modified version for it's use. It was this modified PyPcap that was causing the problem, apparently, since the example in the answer also caused a hang.

I installed the original version of PyPcap (from Google's site), and Scapy started working fine (I didn't try many things, but at least it didn't crash as soon as I started sniffing). I sent a new defect ticket to the Scapy developers: http://trac.secdev.org/scapy/ticket/166 , hope they can do something with it.

QP (Quantum Platform) is a family of lightweight, open source software frameworks for building responsive and modular real-time embedded applications as systems of cooperating, event-driven active objects (actors) .

The QP family consists of QP/C, QP/C++, and QP-nano frameworks, which are all quality controlled, documented, [1] and commercially licensable .

All QP frameworks can run on "bare-metal" single-chip microcontrollers , completely replacing a traditional Real-Time Operating System (RTOS) . Ports and ready-to-use examples are provided for all major CPU families . QP/C and QP/C++ can also work with a traditional OS / RTOS , such as: POSIX ( Linux , QNX ), Windows , VxWorks , ThreadX , MicroC/OS , FreeRTOS , etc.