Friuli venezia giulia cartina stradale

 

The Friuli Venezia Giulia region of Italy is one of the smallest, yet most culturally diverse areas in all the country. This semi-autonomous area is also one of the newest, gaining it modern boundaries and government in 1963. Occupying the extreme northeast corner of Italy east of the river Tagliamento with the Alps looming from the north, the region shares borders with the Veneto region, Austria and Slovenia. This is by far the most easily accessible region from outside of Italy and has traditionally acted as a gateway for Germanic and Slavic invaders over the centuries.

Friuli Venezia Giulia wines are rightfully praised as some of the best and the region is home to several DOC wine zones with Ramandolo receiving the coveted DOCG designation. Well-aged and tannic reds include Refosco dal Peduncolo and Schiopettino that go well with the meat and game dishes of the region. However, the whites of the Friuli Venezia Giulia really stand out with the fragrant yet dry Tocai being the most popular for everyday consumption. When eating seafood the local Malvasia Istriana is ideal, as is the ancient Ribolla gialla. Vitoska is another white but is usually served as an aperitivo while Picolit is a white dessert wine.

Friulian Grappa, made from stems and skins after making wine is considered the best in Italy. This native liquor, the only true Italian spirit once had a nasty reputation as "Italian moonshine" and was not usually found outside Italy. However, it is finally becoming popular outside of Italy thanks to standardization in the distilling process and some savvy marketing.

Friuli venezia giulia cartina stradale

Trieste – Friuli Venezia Giulia Airport ( IATA : TRS ,  ICAO : LIPQ ) (Italian: Aeroporto di Trieste–Friuli Venezia Giulia ), formerly Trieste – Ronchi dei Legionari Airport , is an international airport located 0.3  NM (0.56 km; 0.35 mi) west of Ronchi dei Legionari ( Province of Gorizia ), [1] near Trieste in Venezia Giulia , north-eastern Italy . The airport has a catchment area of approximately 5 million people, stretching beyond Friuli-Venezia Giulia into Slovenia and Croatia .

The first official documents citing the airfield of Ronchi dei Legionari date back to 30 November 1935, when the 4th Fighter Wing of the Royal Italian Air Force was based here. Commercial operations officially began on 2 December 1961. [ citation needed ]

Aeroporto Friuli Venezia Giulia S.p.A. is the company that has been running the airport since July 1997; the airport's sole shareholder is the Friuli Venezia Giulia Region . In recent years the airport has witnessed an increase in low-cost routes and cargo aircraft. In addition to this, the Company aims at developing non-aviation activities at the airport. The "Polo Intermodale" project is part of this planned expansion, that envisages the development of a multi-modal (air-road-rail) interchange that will be built in the near future just in front of the airport terminal.

The Friuli Venezia Giulia region of Italy is one of the smallest, yet most culturally diverse areas in all the country. This semi-autonomous area is also one of the newest, gaining it modern boundaries and government in 1963. Occupying the extreme northeast corner of Italy east of the river Tagliamento with the Alps looming from the north, the region shares borders with the Veneto region, Austria and Slovenia. This is by far the most easily accessible region from outside of Italy and has traditionally acted as a gateway for Germanic and Slavic invaders over the centuries.

Friuli Venezia Giulia wines are rightfully praised as some of the best and the region is home to several DOC wine zones with Ramandolo receiving the coveted DOCG designation. Well-aged and tannic reds include Refosco dal Peduncolo and Schiopettino that go well with the meat and game dishes of the region. However, the whites of the Friuli Venezia Giulia really stand out with the fragrant yet dry Tocai being the most popular for everyday consumption. When eating seafood the local Malvasia Istriana is ideal, as is the ancient Ribolla gialla. Vitoska is another white but is usually served as an aperitivo while Picolit is a white dessert wine.

Friulian Grappa, made from stems and skins after making wine is considered the best in Italy. This native liquor, the only true Italian spirit once had a nasty reputation as "Italian moonshine" and was not usually found outside Italy. However, it is finally becoming popular outside of Italy thanks to standardization in the distilling process and some savvy marketing.

Friuli Venezia Giulia has always been considered a bridge between East and West, and Trieste , the capital of this northern region of Italy, was the hub of this Mitteleuropean culture in the past. If you go for a holiday in Friuli Venezia Giulia ...

and visit Trieste, don't miss out Piazza Unità d'Italia , the city's central square, a sort of amazing and big terrace overlooking the sea; Miramar Castle and Duino castles should also be pointed out: situated on top of a cliff overhanging the sea, these two amazing castles are located just a few kilometres far from Trieste.

Other interesting sites to visit for their historical and artistic attractions are Grado , a Roman city where you shouldn't miss out Santa Maria delle Grazie and Sant'Eufemia Basils, and Cividale del Friuli , whose main sights are the Lombard shrine and Duke Rachis' altar, a beautiful example of Lombard Renaissance sculpture.

It's not on a lot of tourist itineraries, but the Friuli-Venezia Giulia region of Italy is an interesting area with several worthy tourist destinations, and almost every possible type of landscape. The region is located in the north-east corner of Italy, bordered by Austria and Slovenia and close to Croatia. It occupies a kind of large amphitheatre between the mountains and the head of the Adriatic Sea. Friuli-Venezia Giulia has a regional airport (served by cheap flights from the UK) and can be combined with tours of the neighbouring Veneto region .

The region is unevenly divided into four sub-divisions; the provinces of Udine, Gorizia, Trieste and Pordenone. The capital of the region is the city of Trieste. Friuli-Venezia Giulia is one of the regions of Italy to have autonomous status.

As you would imagine, the atmosphere in Friuli-Venezia Giulia is very different to other parts of Italy. Even its cities reflect the different peoples who have inhabited or ruled the region: Cividale was the seat of the Lombards, Udine is Venetian in style, while Trieste in particular is famed for its Central-European ambience. As well as Italian, languages spoken in parts of the region include German, Slovenian and Friulian ( Furlan ). You'll see signs in a variety of languages, and and the area's art, architecture and cuisine have all been strongly influenced by the area's varied cultural background.

Friuli-Venezia Giulia (Free-oo-lee Ve-ne-tsyah Joo-lyah), or FVG for short, is easy to understand, even if it’s a mouthful to say. While red wine lovers crush on Piedmont and Tuscany on the western side of Italy, the greatest white wines can be found in northeastern Italy (save for Sicily and Sardegna… but that’s for another day!).


Friuli-Venezia Giulia lies in the top-right corner of Italy, between Austria, Slovenia, the Adriatic Sea, and Veneto (Venice!). Although the region is relatively small compared to the rest of Italy, it ranks among the best for producers of white wines.

Curiosity: Friuli recently made top 10 most coveted Italian red wines, thanks to cult winemaker Pontoni from winery Miani (with the local red variety Refosco dal Peduncolo Rosso)