Nokia stolen tracking an iphone

 

We have all been there before – our precious cell phone has suddenly gone missing and we have no idea where it is.  We do a quick check of all the places that we normally put it; it isn’t there.  We rehash every event from the time we last remember having our mobile phone to the time when we first noticed that it was missing.  Where did we go?  Who were we with?  What was I wearing?

We try calling our cell phone in the hope that the ringer is on and that it is somewhere nearby.  We pace frantically through our home and run out to the car in the hopes of hearing our awesome ringtone.

But when all of this fails us, we are simply left with worry.  All we can do is hope that some switch will flip in our brain and we will all of a sudden “remember” exactly where it is.

Nokia stolen tracking an iphone

But with GPS, an Android device could also be used for tracking. It may not be the most reliable method, and it does comes with some not-so-insignificant limitations, but it can get the job done. Here’s how you can use your device to pinpoint a person’s or object’s location.

Most Android devices released in 2014 or later have a built-in feature called Android Device Manager . This service constantly pings your device’s location back to Google’s servers so that Google knows where your device is. You can then use Google’s web interface to see where your device is at any given time. You’ll need a Google account to use this feature.

Once enabled, all you have to do is launch a web browser, navigate to the Android Device Manager dashboard , and sign into your account (the same one associated with your device). Click the Locate Device button for said device and it’ll show its last known location. It’s fairly accurate in my experience, but can be off by up to 20 meters in areas with poor GPS visibility.

We have all been there before – our precious cell phone has suddenly gone missing and we have no idea where it is.  We do a quick check of all the places that we normally put it; it isn’t there.  We rehash every event from the time we last remember having our mobile phone to the time when we first noticed that it was missing.  Where did we go?  Who were we with?  What was I wearing?

We try calling our cell phone in the hope that the ringer is on and that it is somewhere nearby.  We pace frantically through our home and run out to the car in the hopes of hearing our awesome ringtone.

But when all of this fails us, we are simply left with worry.  All we can do is hope that some switch will flip in our brain and we will all of a sudden “remember” exactly where it is.

The Most Popular Pirated Software
The most recent SIIA study listing the top pirated software was in 2008 covering the previous year, but since then the organization has reported just by category. In 2010, its annual report broke down the top categories of pirated software as follows:

A look at the popular BitTorrent tracking site, The Pirate Bay, provides a good idea of just which software titles are the most pirated. This list of the top dozen software titles is sorted by torrents with the most seeds, or full copies of the application, with duplicates omitted:

Of course, that's just one torrent indexer, but it gives an idea of the types of software being pirated. Many of the downloads come with cracked keys for the software, too. The list is dominated by Adobe and Microsoft, whom PCMag contacted about piracy in general, and SOPA/PIPA and the Megaupload takedown in specific.

A reader asks: 'Yesterday I lost my smartphone in a taxi cab, and have not been able to recover it. Before I get a new one, are there any tricks I can try to locate a stolen phone? And for the future, what options do I have BEFORE a phone is lost, that will help me get it back?'

If you came looking for an article like this you probably want the answer right now. So I will save the why’s and wherefore’s until later; here is what to do when your phone is lost or stolen:

If it’s an Android phone, immediately try to locate the phone using the built-in Android Device Manager. Is some cases this will work even if you have not previously set up your phone to use Device Manager. You can access Device Manager via Google’s web interface and locate a phone you own via its GPS location data.

Thousands of laptops are lost or stolen each year. People leave them in taxis, trains, hotels and coffee shops, and they’re a prime target by thieves as well. Put your laptop bag down for a minute and a thief might snatch it when you aren’t looking, and a laptop left on your car seat is a huge temptation for opportunistic thieves.

Of course, you stand to lose more than just the hardware. The thief or finder could access personal files and information and even steal your identity.

There is little chance of recovering a lost or stolen laptop unless you take precautions. It’s good practice to make a record of any serial numbers printed on the case that can help identify it. This information can be passed on to the police, lost and found departments at train stations, or wherever you last remember having it. Having this extra information should speed up your laptop’s return if it turns up.